Thu • Apr

Thursday, April 6, 2017



The New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street, New York, NY 10029


$12 General Public | $8 Friends, Fellows, Members, Seniors | Free to Students with ID

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On April 1, 1717, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu wrote her famous "Letter to a Friend" from the Turkish Embassy, describing the process of smallpox inoculation. With that letter, she became one of the earliest vaccination advocates, joined over the next three hundred years by celebrities and scientists, pop culture icons and heads of state, patients and game developers. This talk will explore the colorful and controversial history of vaccine advocacy, the most successful public health measure its beneficiaries love to hate.

About the Speaker

Lisa Rosner is Distinguished Professor of History at Stockton University. She is the recipient of grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Philosophical Society, and the Chemical Heritage Foundation. Recent publications include The Anatomy Murders (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009) and Vaccination and Its Critics (ABC-Clio, 2017). She is the project director and game developer for The Pox Hunter, funded by an NEH Digital Projects for the Public grant.​

Event series:
History of Medicine and Health