Mon • Sep
11

Monday, September 11, 2017

8:00AM-4:00PM

Venue

The New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street, New York, NY 10029

Cost

Free, but advance registration is required

Sponsored by

Age-friendly NYC and Healthfirst

View Agenda

The majority of primary care office visits are made by older people. As this population grows (from 14.5% to 20% of NYC’s population by 2030), the demand for health care services is projected to rise more than 200 percent. Primary care services that address the broader determinants of health can often help to identify and manage communicable and non-communicable diseases, reduce the future cost of care, and facilitate aging in place.

Age-friendly NYC and Healthfirst will host a symposium on September 11, 2017 at the New York Academy of Medicine to highlight health care professionals and institutions that have adopted age-friendly practices and have taken steps to address the broader determinants of health for older New Yorkers. 

Panelists representing hospital systems, federally qualified health centers, accountable care organizations, health insurance, pharmacy, community-based organizations, and government will present evidence-based strategies for implementing age-friendly primary care, as well as innovative solutions to some of the challenges posed by implementation in a rapidly changing policy environment. CMEs for physicians and CEs for Rphs will be provided.

Participants will:

  •     Identify the demographic and clinical trends associated with a growing population over 65 in NYC.
  •     Acquire an understanding of the social determinants of health and their relationship to health outcomes in older adults.
  •     Define the components of age-friendly primary care and explain how age-friendly primary care and a focus on wellness can contribute to the triple aim of better quality and health and lower cost.
  •     Identify the challenges and opportunities of a team-based approach to primary care for older people.
  •     Develop an understanding of how value-based payment reform can facilitate more age-friendly primary care.

We hope to see you there.