Thu • Oct
5

Thursday, October 5, 2017

6:30PM-8:00PM

Venue

The New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street, New York, NY 10029

Cost

Free, advanced registration required

Presented in collaboration with the Museum of the City of New York and supported by a grant from Humanities New York.

In a conversation about her book, More Than Medicine, historian Jennifer Nelson will focus on how feminists of the ‘70s through the ‘90s applied lessons of the New Left and Civil Rights movements to generate a women’s health movement. The new movement shifted from the struggle to revolutionize health care to the focus of ending sex discrimination and gender stereotypes perpetuated in mainstream medical contexts. With renewed attacks on access to health care, contraception, and abortion, Dr. Nelson will suggest ways histories of feminist and social justice activism might provide lessons for current struggles for reproductive freedom.

Who Controls Women’s Health?: A Century of Struggle is a free, three-part talk series that examines key battles over women’s ability to control their bodies, health choices, and fertility. It is developed in collaboration with the Museum of the City of New York and supported by a grant from Humanities New York.

 

 

About the Speaker:

Jennifer Nelson, Professor at University of Redlands, specializes in women’s history, the history of feminism in the United States, and medical histories associated with social justice movements. She has published widely in these fields, including two books, Women of Color and the Reproductive Rights Movement (2003) and More Than Medicine: A History of the Feminist Women’s Health Movement (2015). She is also the co-editor of Women’s Activism and “Second Wave” Feminism: Transnational Histories (2017). Her current research is a study of the history of the transnational movements for and against legal abortion in the United States and Mexico.

Event series:
Who Controls Women's Health?: A Century of Struggle
The series examines key battles over women’s ability to control their bodies, health choices, and fertility.