Mon • Jun

Monday, June 5, 2017



The New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street, New York, NY 10029


$15 General Public | $10 Friends, Fellows, Members, Seniors | Free to Students with ID

Friends, Fellows and Members: enter your email address below to receive your discount. Your discount will be applied at checkout.

In Sarah Lohman's new book, Eight Flavors: The Untold Story of American Cuisine, Lohman traces the origins of the eight most popular flavors in American cooking, looks at the people that brought them to this country, and explores how they shaped American cuisine. Working with the archives at The New York Academy of Medicine, Lohman will explore how Americans shifted from using garlic as a medicine to treat maladies as varied as tuberculosis and hemorrhoids, to consuming two pounds of garlic per capita per year in the 21st century. We'll even explore modern day medical trials to see if garlic's healing properties are fact or fiction.

About the Speaker

Sarah Lohman graduated with a BFA from the Cleveland Institute of Art in 2005 and for her undergraduate thesis, she opened a temporary restaurant/installation that reinterpreted food of the Colonial era for a modern audience. Dubbed an “historic gastronomist,” Lohman recreates historic recipes as a way to make a personal connection with the past. She chronicles her explorations in culinary history on her blog,, and her work has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and NPR. She is the author of Eight Flavors: The Untold Story of American Cuisine (Simon & Schuster, 2016).

Event series:
History of Medicine and Health